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10 Jacobs School Faculty Named in 2020 List of Highly Cited Researchers

10 Jacobs School Faculty Named in 2020 List of Highly Cited Researchers

December 8, 2020

Ten professors at the University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering are among the world’s most influential researchers in their fields, according to a new research citation report from the Web of Science Group. The professors, Ludmil Alexandrov, Trey Ideker, Rob Knight, Nathan E. Lewis, Prashant Mali, Ying Shirley Meng, Bernhard O. Palsson, Joseph Wang, Kun Zhang and Liangfang Zhang, are amone 52 professors and researchers at UC San Diego named in the prestigious list of Highly Cited Researchers in 2020. Full Story


UC San Diego nanoengineer Liangfang Zhang inducted into National Academy of Inventors

UC San Diego nanoengineer Liangfang Zhang inducted into National Academy of Inventors

December 8, 2020

Liangfang Zhang, professor of nanoengineering and director of the chemical engineering program at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, has been named a 2020 fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). Zhang is recognized for his revolutionary work in the field of nanomedicine, which focuses on nanomaterials for medical applications. He invented a way to make nanoparticles perform therapeutic tasks in the body without being rejected by the immune system. Full Story


UC San Diego and LINK-J Seminar Series

UC San Diego and LINK-J Seminar Series

December 2, 2020

UC San Diego professor Nicole Steinmetz and Kyoto University professor Yasuhiko Tabata will discuss the latest trends in nanoengineering and drug delivery technologies at this joint webinar on December 18, 2020 between UC San Diego and LINK-J. Full Story


Virus-like probes could help make rapid COVID-19 testing more accurate, reliable

Virus-like probes could help make rapid COVID-19 testing more accurate, reliable

November 30, 2020

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe. The advance could help expand testing to low-resource, underserved areas. Full Story


Start-up receives up to $15 M to develop nanoparticle therapy for sepsis licensed from UC San Diego

Start-up receives up to $15 M to develop nanoparticle therapy for sepsis licensed from UC San Diego

October 21, 2020

San Diego-based Cellics Therapeutics, which was co-founded by UC San Diego nanoengineering Professor Liangfang Zhang, has received an award of up to $15 M from Boston-based accelerator CARB-X to develop a macrophage cellular nanosponge—nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages—designed to treat sepsis. Full Story


Nanoengineers, radiologists work toward immunotherapy for liver cancer

Nanoengineers, radiologists work toward immunotherapy for liver cancer

August 13, 2020

A team of nanoengineers and interventional radiologists at UC San Diego and the VA San Diego Healthcare System received a $575,000 grant from the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) to develop a new method to treat liver cancer by combining ablation—a treatment to destroy tumors—with an immunotherapy derived from a plant virus. Full Story


Nanoengineering and chemical engineering at UC San Diego in the spotlight

Nanoengineering and chemical engineering at UC San Diego in the spotlight

August 10, 2020

A creative group of faculty, students and staff within the University of California San Diego are taking innovative approaches to develop breakthroughs in nanomedicine, flexible electronics, and energy storage. Together, this group makes up the Department of NanoEngineering and the Chemical Engineering Program at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. A virtual issue of the journal ACS Nano highlights the wide ranging research, educational and workforce-development contributions of this extraordinary group.  Full Story


A nanomaterial path forward for COVID-19 vaccine development

A nanomaterial path forward for COVID-19 vaccine development

July 15, 2020

From mRNA vaccines entering clinical trials, to peptide-based vaccines and using molecular farming to scale vaccine production, the COVID-19 pandemic is pushing new and emerging nanotechnologies into the frontlines and the headlines. Nanoengineers at UC San Diego detail the current approaches to COVID-19 vaccine development, and highlight how nanotechnology has enabled these advances, in a review article in Nature Nanotechnology published July 15. Full Story


Nature Nanotechnology webinar with Nicole Steinmetz

Nature Nanotechnology webinar with Nicole Steinmetz

June 24, 2020

Watch this Nature Nanotechnology webinar with Nicole Steinmetz, UC San Diego nanoengineering professor. She discusses how nanotechnology can contribute to COVID-19 research. Full Story


NIH grant to bioprint nanoparticles for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

NIH grant to bioprint nanoparticles for ovarian cancer immunotherapy

June 19, 2020

Nanoengineers at UC San Diego received a five-year, $2.9 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to develop an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer using plant virus nanoparticles. The particles will be produced using 3D-bioprinting, enabling them to be released at specified intervals, instead of a continuous slow release. Full Story


Nanosponges Could Intercept Coronavirus Infection

Nanosponges Could Intercept Coronavirus Infection

June 17, 2020

Nanoparticles cloaked in human lung cell membranes and human immune cell membranes can attract and neutralize the SARS-CoV-2 virus in cell culture, causing the virus to lose its ability to hijack host cells and reproduce. Instead of targeting the virus itself, these nanosponges, developed by engineers at UC San Diego, are designed to protect the healthy cells the virus invades.   Full Story


Virtual Q&A: nanotech and COVID-19

Virtual Q&A: nanotech and COVID-19

June 10, 2020

The journal Nature Nanotechnology is hosting an online Q&A session with Nicole Steinmetz, UC San Diego nanoengineering professor, and Ronit Satchi-Fainaro, Tel Aviv University professor. Nicole and Ronit will present their work on COVID-19 and discuss how nanotechnology can contribute to COVID-19 research. The event is Wednesday June 17, 2020 from 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM. Full Story


I'm gonna contribute to the revolution of the pharmaceutical world

I'm gonna contribute to the revolution of the pharmaceutical world

May 20, 2020

When Qiangzhe “Oliver” Zhang was still a high school student in China applying to colleges in the United States, UC San Diego’s chemical engineering program at Jacobs School of Engineering was at the top of his list. “I knew they had this very new, very innovative nanoengineering program,” he said. “It’s one of a kind, and that got me really excited.” Now, almost eight years later, Zhang is working at the leading edge of biomedical research under Liangfang Zhang in the Nanomaterials and Nanomedicine Laboratory, developing new technologies that could completely change how scientists combat viruses like HIV and SARS-CoV-2 Full Story


Marrying molecular farming and advanced manufacturing to develop a COVID-19 vaccine

Marrying molecular farming and advanced manufacturing to develop a COVID-19 vaccine

April 20, 2020

UC San Diego nanoengineers received a Rapid Response Research (RAPID) grant from the National Science Foundation to develop—using a plant virus—a stable, easy to manufacture COVID-19 vaccine patch that can be shipped around the world and painlessly self-administered by patients. Full Story


'Decoy' nanoparticles can block HIV and prevent infection

'Decoy' nanoparticles can block HIV and prevent infection

April 20, 2020

Flipping the standard viral drug targeting approach on its head, engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed a promising new “nanosponge” method for preventing HIV from proliferating in the body: coating polymer nanoparticles with the membranes of T helper cells and turning them into decoys to intercept viral particles and block them from binding and infiltrating the body’s actual immune cells.  Full Story


Part 2: Treating Cancer with Plant Viruses: A Conversation with Nicole Steinmetz

Part 2: Treating Cancer with Plant Viruses: A Conversation with Nicole Steinmetz

April 14, 2020

In this second episode of Stories from the NNI featuring UC San Diego nanoengineering professor Nicole Steinmetz, she describes her work using plant virus-based nanoparticles to train the immune system to fight cancer. Full Story


Treating Cancer with Plant Viruses: A Conversation with Nicole Steinmetz

Treating Cancer with Plant Viruses: A Conversation with Nicole Steinmetz

March 11, 2020

In this episode of Stories from the NNI, nanoengineering professor Nicole Steinmetz at UC San Diego describes her work using plant virus-based nanoparticles to train the immune system to fight cancer, as well as for targeted delivery of pesticides to improve plant health. Steinmetz also discusses the mission of the Center for Nano-ImmunoEngineering at UC San Diego, for which she serves as the director. Full Story


Controlling CAR T cells with light selectively destroys skin tumors in mice

Controlling CAR T cells with light selectively destroys skin tumors in mice

February 19, 2020

UC San Diego bioengineers have developed a control system that could make CAR T-cell therapy safer and more powerful when treating cancer. By programming CAR T cells to switch on when exposed to blue light, the researchers controlled the cells to destroy skin tumors in mice without harming healthy tissue. Full Story


Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy

Drug-light combo could offer control over CAR T-cell therapy

October 15, 2019

UC San Diego bioengineers are a step closer to making CAR T-cell therapy safer, more precise and easy to control. They developed a system that allows them to select where and when CAR T cells get turned on so that they destroy cancer cells without harming normal cells. Full Story


Anticancer vaccines, natural language for computers, and multifunctional materials take center stage at UC San Diego Research Expo

Anticancer vaccines, natural language for computers, and multifunctional materials take center stage at UC San Diego Research Expo

March 14, 2019

The University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering was just ranked the #11 graduate engineering program in the country by US News. Hear from more than 200 of these talented graduate students as they present their research at the 38th annual Jacobs School Research Expo, a showcase of the top engineering and computer science work underway at UC San Diego. Full Story


A bioengineered factory for T-cells

A bioengineered factory for T-cells

February 11, 2019

Researchers have developed an injectable sponge-like gel that enhances the production of T-cells after a bone marrow transplant, increasing the quantity and diversity of these key components of the immune system. This bioengineered device can be injected under the skin at the same time of the transplant to help revive the immune system after bone marrow transplantation.  Full Story


Micromotors deliver oral vaccines

Micromotors deliver oral vaccines

February 8, 2019

UC San Diego nanoengineering researchers have developed oral vaccines powered by micromotors that target the mucus layer of the intestine.  Full Story


Programming White Blood Cells to Fight Pancreatic Cancer

Programming White Blood Cells to Fight Pancreatic Cancer

February 5, 2019

Pancreatic cancer is the third most lethal cancer in the United States. Patients typically don’t know they have it until it’s too late, making it difficult to treat. Only 9 percent survive five years after diagnosis. But recent discoveries at the UC San Diego Institute of Engineering in Medicine are raising hope. Engineers and surgeons are working on a treatment by reprogramming white blood cells to target and eradicate pancreatic cancer tumors. Full Story


Four Jacobs School Professors Named AAAS Fellows

Four Jacobs School Professors Named AAAS Fellows

November 26, 2018

Four researchers at the Jacobs School of Engineering at UC San Diego have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the largest general science organization in the United States and publisher of the journal Science. Farhat Beg, Rajesh Gupta, Pavel Pevzner and Liangfang Zhang join a total of 416 AAAS members that have been awarded this honor because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.  Full Story


Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

Neutrophil nanosponges soak up proteins that promote rheumatoid arthritis

September 3, 2018

Engineers have developed neutrophil “nanosponges” that can safely absorb and neutralize a variety of proteins that play a role in the progression of rheumatoid arthritis. Injections of these nanosponges effectively treated severe rheumatoid arthritis in two mouse models. Administering the nanosponges early on also prevented the disease from developing. The nanosponges are nanoparticles of biodegradable polymer coated with the cell membranes of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell.  Full Story


Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system

Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy system

January 15, 2018

A team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells. Full Story


Macrophage nanosponges could keep sepsis in check

Macrophage nanosponges could keep sepsis in check

January 4, 2018

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed macrophage "nanosponges"—nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages—that can safely remove sepsis-causing molecules from the bloodstream. In lab tests, these macrophage nanosponges improved survival rates in mice with sepsis. Full Story


Smart molecules trigger white blood cells to become better cancer-eating machines

Smart molecules trigger white blood cells to become better cancer-eating machines

September 28, 2017

A team of researchers has engineered smart protein molecules that can reprogram white blood cells to ignore a self-defense signaling mechanism that cancer cells use to survive and spread in the body. Researchers say the advance could lead to a new method of re-engineering immune cells to fight cancer and infectious diseases. The team successfully tested this method in a live cell culture system.  Full Story


Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach

Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach

August 16, 2017

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH.  Full Story


UC San Diego nanoengineer selected as the U.S. nominee for 2017 ASPIRE Prize

UC San Diego nanoengineer selected as the U.S. nominee for 2017 ASPIRE Prize

April 25, 2017

Nanoengineering professor Liangfang Zhang at the University of California San Diego has been selected as the U.S. nominee for the APEC Science Prize for Innovation, Research and Education (ASPIRE). Zhang won the nomination for his revolutionary work in the field of nanomedicine, which focuses on nanomaterials for medical applications.  Full Story


UC San Diego nanoengineer makes Popular Science's 'Brilliant 10' list

UC San Diego nanoengineer makes Popular Science's 'Brilliant 10' list

September 12, 2016

Popular Science magazine has named Liangfang Zhang, a nanoengineering professor at the University of California San Diego, in its 15th annual “Brilliant 10” list, a lineup of “the 10 most innovative young minds in science and engineering.” Zhang was recognized for his revolutionary work in the field of nanomedicine, which focuses on nanomaterials for medical applications. Full Story


Targeted drug delivery with these nanoparticles can make medicines more effective

Targeted drug delivery with these nanoparticles can make medicines more effective

September 16, 2015

Nanoparticles disguised as human platelets could greatly enhance the healing power of drug treatments for cardiovascular disease and systemic bacterial infections. These platelet-mimicking nanoparticles, developed by NanoEngineers at UC San Diego, are capable of delivering drugs to targeted sites in the body — particularly injured blood vessels, as well as organs infected by harmful bacteria.  Full Story


Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections

Gel filled with nanosponges cleans up MRSA infections

May 18, 2015

Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego developed a gel filled with toxin-absorbing nanosponges that could lead to an effective treatment for skin and wound infections caused by MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), an antibiotic-resistant bacteria. This nanosponge-hydrogel minimized the growth of skin lesions on mice infected with MRSA – without the use of antibiotics. The researchers recently published their findings online in Advanced Materials. Full Story


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